Resistance Training for Feb/March 2013: SEAL-style training.

In  this post I’m going to talk about a new resistance training routine I’m currently doing. Based on exercises and work-load used by Navy SEALS, it has been a tough challenge that is producing some amazing results.

Warm Ups:

In-place warm ups

-Do each exercise for 10 reps apiece, one after the other. Repeat circuit for a total of 2 sets.

  1. Jumping Jack 
  2. Seal Jack
  3. Highland Cross-Over
  4. Pogo Hops
  5. Prisoner Squats
  6. Wide-outs
  7. Gate Swings
  8. Forward Lunges
  9. Low Side-to-side Lunges

Upper-body Muscle Activation Exercises

– Do each exercise for 8 reps apiece, one after the other. Repeat on opposite side/limb if necessary.

  1. Neck Lean
  2. Neck Turn
  3. Neck Rotations
  4. Neck Up & Down
  5. Wrist Rotations
  6. Shoulder Rotations
  7. Shoulder Swim
  8. Upward Arm Extensions
  9. Windmills
  10. Core Rotations
  11. Core Circles
  12. Side Lean
  13. Forward Bends

Lower Body Muscle Activation Exercises

– Do each exercise for 8 reps apiece, one after the other. Repeat on opposite side/limb if necessary.

  1. Hip Raise
  2. Straight Leg Raises
  3. Side-lying Straight Leg Raises
  4. Cat-Camel
  5. Naughty Dog
  6. Naughty Dog Forward Rotation
  7. Naughty Dog Reverse Rotation
  8. Straight-legged Naughty Dog
  9. Donkey Kick
  10. Prone Knee-raises
  11. Prone Trunk Twist
  12. Supine Trunk Twist

Resistance Exercises (Upper and Lower Body Movements)

Exercise                                       Set#1          Set#2          Set#3          Set#4

Pull Ups                                           30                  25                    20                 15

Front Squats                                  25                  20                   15                   N/A

Chin Ups                                         20                  15                    10                     5

Alt Sandbag Lunge                     16                    10                    8                      N/A

Chair Dips                                      25                    25                    25                   25

Kettle High-Pulls                        20                    15                     10                  N/A

Push-Ups (regular)                    30                  20                      15                   10

Sandbag Good Mornings         20                    15                     10                       5

Diamond Push-Ups                   30                   20                      15                     10

-Rest 2-3min between each set, start with 2x sets on week #1 and build upwards from there for 4-6 weeks total. Repeat workout session 2-3x a week on non-consecutive days. (EX: Mon, Wed, Fri)

-Rest 5-10 min after Upper/Lower body exercises before moving on to Core exercises.

Core Exercises

-Do Each exercise for 15-20 reps (per side if necessary). Rest 1 min between sets, repeat for 2-4 sets total.

Exercises:

Toe-reach Crunches

Sit-Ups

Swiss-ball Crunches

Knee Grabs

Oblique Crunches

Lower Ab Crunches

Flutter/Scissor Kicks.

-Remember to complete a full-body stretch routine, holding each position for 15-25 sec, after finishing entire exercise routine.

Cadiovascular Training Routine for December 2012

As promised here is my latest Cardiovascular Training Routine!

This Cardiovascular routine is done on Tuesdays and Wednesdays, with Resistance sessions done on Mondays and Fridays.

Warm Ups:

In-place warm ups

-Do each exercise for 10 reps apiece, one after the other. Repeat circuit for a total of 2 sets.

  1. Jumping Jack 
  2. Seal Jack
  3. Highland Cross-Over
  4. Pogo Hops
  5. Prisoner Squats
  6. Wide-outs
  7. Gate Swings
  8. Forward Lunges
  9. Low Side-to-side Lunges

Upper-body Muscle Activation Exercises

– Do each exercise for 8 reps apiece, one after the other. Repeat on opposite side/limb if necessary.

  1. Neck Lean
  2. Neck Turn
  3. Neck Rotations
  4. Neck Up & Down
  5. Wrist Rotations
  6. Shoulder Rotations
  7. Shoulder Swim
  8. Upward Arm Extensions
  9. Windmills
  10. Core Rotations
  11. Core Circles
  12. Side Lean
  13. Forward Bends

Lower Body Muscle Activation Exercises

– Do each exercise for 8 reps apiece, one after the other. Repeat on opposite side/limb if necessary.

  1. Hip Raise
  2. Straight Leg Raises
  3. Side-lying Straight Leg Raises
  4. Cat-Camel
  5. Naughty Dog
  6. Naughty Dog Forward Rotation
  7. Naughty Dog Reverse Rotation
  8. Straight-legged Naughty Dog
  9. Donkey Kick
  10. Prone Knee-raises
  11. Prone Trunk Twist
  12. Supine Trunk Twist

Cardiovascular Heart & Lung Training 

-See earlier blog entry on “Jumping Jack Pyramids”. Do two complete rounds of JJP’s w/1-2 min rest in between each round.

REST 3 MIN-

Cardiovascular Muscle and Movement Training

-AMAP stands for “As many as possible”, do 30 sec on each side for hammer-training movements.

-Done in Circuit style, complete each round one after the other until all rounds are finished.

-Make sure to use a challenging but manageable weight. You should feel resistance but be able to complete all the prescribed repetitions.

Circuit #1

Round #1: 1min AMAP Axe-swing hammer routine, 15 kettle-bell swings, 15 mountain climbers

Round #2: 1min AMAP Shovel-dig hammer routine, 15 kettle-bell swings, 15 mountain climbers

Round #3: 1min AMAP Hammer-strike hammer routine, 15 kettle-bell swings, 15 mountain climbers

REST 2 MIN-

Circuit #2

Round #1: 1min AMAP Butter-churn hammer routine, 8 kettle bell clean & press per arm, 5 Turkish get-ups per arm

Round #2: 1min AMAP Fireman-chop hammer routine, 8 kettle bell clean & press per arm, 5 Turkish get-ups per arm

Round #3: 1min AMAP Chimney-sweep hammer routine, 8 kettle bell clean & press per arm, 5 Turkish get-ups per arm

REST 8 min-

Complete full body stretch routine that fits your ability and works every major muscle group, holding on every stretch for 20-30 seconds.

A long time ago I heard a story

“A long time ago I heard a story. A story about a man who came to town. That man stood on a street corner and started to talk.

He talked of how to make the world a better place, and like that, the man continued to talk day after day. At first everyone listened to him, some even wanted to fight along side him.

But…

Everyone soon lost interest. For them, they didn’t care what the world ended up being like. The man didn’t give up. He grew older and even when nobody listened to him at all, he continued his talks.

One day a passing child asked the man: “Why do you continue to talk, even when no one is listening?”

The man answered: “At first I thought I could change them, but now I know that to be an impossible dream. The reason I never stop talking, the reason I never stop fighting boy…I put my whole life, my whole existence on the line for this one purpose. I don’t want to make that life a lie” “

-Remain loyal to yourself-

In-home carido routine: Jumping Jack Pyramid Circuits

Hey Readers!

I’m going to start posting simple in-home resistance and cardio circuit routines that I recommend or personally use. The ones I post here will use little to no props/equipment and use basic movements/exercises that everyone is familiar with. Any unfamiliar exercises I’ll post how-to links! Before starting any exercise regimen please check with your doctor to make sure that you are healthy for exercise. If at any time during any exercise you feel light headed or severely out of breath, stop, rest and use your better judgement about resuming exercise that session. If similar problems occur seek medical attention and a physician’s opinion.

Jumping Jack Pyramid Circuits: 

Remember when doing jumping jacks to keep your arms straight through the entire movement and jump feet to at least shoulder-width apart, landing on the balls of your feet for safe, quick movements. Keep your core tight and active, and your breathing strong!

The basic set breaks down to this:

Jacks 10 seconds, rest 10 seconds;

Jacks 20 seconds, rest 20 seconds;

Jacks 30 seconds, rest 30 seconds;

Jacks 30 seconds, rest 30 seconds;

Jacks 20 seconds, rest 20 seconds;

Jacks 10 seconds, rest 10 seconds;

Jacks 10 seconds, rest 10 seconds;

Jacks 20 seconds, rest 20 seconds;

Jacks 30 seconds, rest 30 seconds

That’s one Circuit Round, after completing the last 30 second set of jacks in a Circuit Round rest 2 min then repeat the entire Circuit Round  3-4 times total. It should take about 5min, 30 seconds for each Circuit Round to be completed. An intense cardiovascular routine, like this one, should last at least 20 min.

Train smart and safe, always keep well hydrated and above all have fun!

A Human Weapon

I have been surprising myself recently with how effective years of martial and combat training, both self and instructed, have ingrained within me instincts and techniques that are now second nature. Without thinking I assume balanced body postures, execute deadly and controlling techniques in a flash and read opponents body language.

It is surprising because of the lack of experience and conflicts in my life over the past few years. I’ve let my technique stagnate and rust from lack of necessity, as well as a lack of training partners.  These recent experiences prove that with  years of study, training and devotion to the combative arts, it is not easily forgotten.

The training becomes part of you, extends into and out from you, until you become a living, breathing human weapon. Transcending styles, techniques, or specific weapons; Treading a line between a savage beast and an enlightened warrior; Allowing yourself to become one with your surroundings and using your environment to achieve victory.

As with any weapon, you hope you never have to use it, but it should always be maintained and at the ready. If the time comes that it is needed, it cannot fail on you. It must strike with the force it was crafted to have. My training and instincts are there and I should not try to suppress them. They are part of me,  along with the control and experience to know when and how to use them.

It is about time I started to polish and refine my skills. I need to maintain my weapon. I pray each day I am never needed but if I am, my actions will be swift, concise and consummate. I am a living, breathing, feeling, human weapon.

Standing Up: Thoughts on personal goals, motivations and how they affect the endurance of self and spirit.

After a long training session with Miller today I had something to say, a daily lesson or moment of inspiration if you will. I thought I’d share with you my friends:

As a kid I always had ideas of heroes of justice who fought evil and never gave up. I always wanted to be one of those heroes. Maybe it was a representation of how weak and powerless I felt as a kid, and trust me I did. Maybe it was the delusions and day dreams so many young boys and girls have, who knows.

Nowadays I don’t know if I believe in justice, justice is a relative thing. It changes with the times. Justice is different to every person and every world view. I do,however, have things I believe in, people I want to protect. These are the things I fight on for, things I train for. The physical training I devote myself to isn’t about the improved physical ability, that’s secondary. It is about the discipline of self, commitment to a goal, humbling oneself before a trial and above all endurance and training of the spirit. It is using the physical trial as a means to develop inner fortitude. For it is in those moments of absolute fatigue of mind, body and spirit that we find our true selves, honest endurance and pure perseverance.

In these tests (that we either test ourselves with, or life tests us with) that we must remember our goals, our motivation, what drives us. When you are at your weakest, remember these things. It can be physical or immaterial. Whatever is at the core of your heart, your soul, that can help you move forward. Many times I have found myself so physically worn that I am almost unable to move from the ground. I focus then on what is important to me, why I am fighting and training, why I am living.

I get up on my hands, then knees; a foot at a time, slowly. The fatigue is there, the pain is there, but I am also there with breath still in my lungs. If I am breathing then I am alive. If I am alive then I can fight.  If I can fight on then I can stand up again. If I can stand up again I can accomplish anything.

Find what you believe in, find it for yourself and stand up on your own.

C.Q.S.D: Close Quarters Self Defense; Principles and Tenants

Before any technique begins a martial art program should codify and express clearly what their trying to impart and for what reason. The following five principles have been refined through years of study and months of re-writing. They are my take and foundation as to what I believe makes up a practical, effective and efficient self defense regimen. By no means do I assume that my concepts are original or superior, these are merely my observations and thoughts on what a solid foundation to a practical self-defense program should include or touch upon.

1) Simple to learn/Employ simple principles and techniques

A system should be able to be picked up quickly and applied by anyone regardless of strength or size. Athletic aptitude or physical build  should not hamper or heighten one’s ability in self defense. Self dense is not a match or competition. It is straightforward, simple and effective; it is about neutralizing and controlling a threat until the defender is safe and out of harm’s way.

2) Adaptability

A system should use concepts, principles and techniques that adapt easily for the defender regardless of environment, health, clothing worn, equipment carried or job requirement. Understand who your students are and their daily lives.  Convey this spirit of adaptability to the students as well. Show how simple things carried can be utilized and adapted in personal defense.  Teach them to use this adaptability as a powerful tool in self defense, that rigidity has no place in technique, principle or defense.

3) Teach from natural every day movements and postures

A system should focus on how the body moves in naturally in everyday life. Do no have students fixed into rigid fighting stances since seldom is a defender in a position where they can be in a fighting stance. Attacks come sudden in real life and students must be taught this and how to react. By teaching from natural and everyday movements this increases the chances of successful defense and confidence in the defender should an attack occur.

4) A Practical and useful training class/routine

A system should foster a training curriculum that builds muscle fatigue and muscle memory  through exercise and practice that relates to the movements, techniques and principles of the defense program. Little time should be paid to warm up and pre-routine stretching as the defender will never have a chance for this in the real world. If exercises are done they should relate or enhance in some way to the movements or techniques that will be practiced in the lesson/session.

5) Simulate real world conditions/scenarios/responses

Through role play and situational awareness a system should familiarize and teach students  how to master themselves and face real world conflict and attacks. This will help build defender confidence as well as teach them how to stay calm and collected when faced with aggression and/or an attack. Attention should be paid to reaction time as well as breath control to help master and work with adrenaline rather then against it.